Valveless rotary internal combustion engine

Abstract

A rotatably alternating air or water cooled two-stroke internal combustion engine comprising a cylindrical casing, and a rotor comprising two radially extending vanes affixed to a shaft rotatably mounted within the casing upon two end plates. Two longitudinally extending walls affixed to the casing. Sealing strips provided between said walls, the shaft, the vanes, the casing and the end plates respectively. Working and supercharging interior chambers between the vanes and the walls. The casing and/or the end plates equipped with ports which communicate with the interior chambers, allowing for intake of combustible air-fuel mixture and exhaust thereafter. Ignition means delivering a spark at the end of each working cycle. An extendable and adjustable connecting rod assembly converting the oscillating bi-directional rotary motion of the output shaft into a continuous unidirectional motion of the main shaft. A self lubricating mechanism incorporated into the engine.

Claims

1. A rotatably two-stroke reciprocating valveless vane internal combustion engine comprising: a cylindrical casing ( 1 ), said cylindrical casing including: a double wall wherein cooling fluid is passing through; longitudinally extending walls ( 2 , 3 ) being unitary or affixed to said cylindrical casing ( 1 ); end plates ( 10 & 11 ); a power output rotary hollow shaft ( 6 ) mounted within said cylindrical casing upon said end plates ( 10 & 11 ) and vanes ( 7 & 8 ); four chambers (a, b, c & d) formed between the vanes ( 7 & 8 ) and the longitudinally extending walls ( 2 & 3 ) inside said cylindrical casing; wherein said vanes ( 7 & 8 ) are unitary or affixed to said power output rotary hollow shaft ( 6 ), and thereby alternatively rotate in back and forth fashion with respect to said longitudinally extending walls in such manner that the volume of said four chambers between said vanes compresses and expands in such sequence that a two-stroke mode of internal combustion engine operates; wherein one or two of said four chambers are sequentially or simultaneously operated in a stroke of intake-and-compression, and then in a reversed stroke of expulsion-and-exhaust; sealing strips ( 9 & 12 ) embodied in grooves and provided between said longitudinally extending walls ( 2 & 3 ) and the power output rotary hollow shaft ( 6 ), and between said vanes ( 7 & 8 ), said cylindrical casing ( 1 ) and said endplates ( 10 & 11 ) respectively; intake ports ( 15 ab , 15 cd , 15 ac & 15 bd ); exhaust ports ( 14 ); wherein each set of said intake and exhaust ports ( 14 , 15 ) includes intake ports and/or injection means ( 15 ) for simultaneously delivering/supplying combustible air-fuel mixture and/or lubricating oil into said working chambers, and exhaust ports ( 14 ) for discharging exhaust gas; wherein each of said intake ports is located on said end plates ( 10 & 11 ) or on said cylindrical casing ( 1 ) close to said longitudinally extending walls ( 2 & 3 ) and is connected via an intake tube to a membrane ( 29 ), which opens and closes said intake tube; wherein each of said exhaust ports is located on said end plates or heads ( 10 or 11 ) or on said cylindrical casing ( 1 ) and is connected via an exhaust tube to a ball ( 30 ) or a conical member ( 31 ), which opens and closes said exhaust tube; additional intake ports ( 15 e ) each one for each supporting chamber, located opposite the intake ports ( 15 ) respectively, connected via tubes to opening and closing members, delivering air only, air/lubricant or air/lubricant/fuel mixture into the supporting chamber; two couple of apertures ( 15 f , 15 g ) connected to external tubes and allowing additional air or air/fuel/lubricant mixture to move one way from the supporting chambers into the working chambers, converting the supporting chambers into superchargers; and a couple of ignition means ( 16 & 17 , 18 & 19 , 16 & 18 or 17 & 19 ) igniting the compressed fuel at maximum compression and firing sequentially or simultaneously into said working chambers at the end of each cycle. 2. The rotatably two-stroke reciprocating valveless vane internal combustion engine according to claim 1 further comprising: a cavity ( 33 ) inside the top of said longitudinally extended wall ( 2 ) connected via an oil tube ( 34 ) to a container of oil ( 32 ) on the top of cylindrical casing ( 1 ); a ball ( 35 ) floating on the surface of the oil inside said cavity ( 33 ) and closing said oil tube ( 34 ) when the amount of oil in said cavity is sufficient; an opening ( 36 ) at the lower end of said longitudinally extended wall ( 2 ) allowing oil to leak from said cavity ( 33 ) on the flat portion ( 6 . 1 ) of said power output rotary hollow shaft ( 6 ); wherein said opening is narrow at the top and at the bottom, forming a dosing compartment ( 36 . 1 ) in the middle and supplying the inside of the engine with exact portion of necessary lubrication; a segment ( 36 . 2 ) having a pin or a bolt profile, closing the top of said compartment ( 36 . 1 ) in a down position and opening the bottom, allowing the oil to leak from said compartment ( 36 . 1 ) onto said flat portion ( 6 . 1 ) of said power output rotary hollow shaft ( 6 ) when said shaft ( 6 ) rotates; a spring ( 36 . 3 ) facilitating the downward motion of said segment ( 36 . 2 ), allowing said segment ( 36 . 2 ) to close the dosing compartment ( 36 . 1 ) and to serve as sealing strip between said longitudinally extended wall ( 2 ) and said power output rotary hollow shaft ( 6 ); and multiple channels and grooves ( 6 . 2 and 6 . 3 ) running on the surface and inside said power output rotary hollow shaft ( 6 ) and vanes ( 7 & 8 ), and delivering lubricating oil from said dosing compartment ( 36 . 1 ) to internal surface of the engine. 3. The rotatably two-stroke reciprocating valveless vane internal combustion engine according to claim 1 further comprising: an oil container ( 32 ), located on the bottom of the engine, connected via tubes ( 34 , 34 c & 34 d ) to chambers (c & d), delivering lubricating oil into said chambers; and channels and grooves ( 6 . 2 and 6 . 3 ) running on the surface and inside shaft ( 6 ) and vanes ( 7 & 8 ), dispersing the lubricated oil from said chambers over the interior surface of the engine when said vanes are in motion.
This is a division of application Ser. No. 11/176,899 filed Jul. 8, 2005, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,222,601 B1, granted on May 29, 2007. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION This invention relates to a rotatively reciprocating vane internal combustion engine having few moving parts, high efficiency, and a low weight-to-power ratio. In an age of environmental concerns and waning natural resources, a lightweight, highly efficient, low fuel consumption engine has been vigorously sought. In the past, attempts have been made to improve on reciprocating piston engines but their inherent complexity and high weight-to-power ratio has proven limiting. Also rotary or Wankel design engines have become relatively highly developed, they still exhibit daunting problems in rotor sealing and cost parameters. For example, the Wankel engine is difficult to manufacture, it has a short life, it has a problem of loosing its lubrication and seizing up. It has poor gas mileage, high oil consumption and high exhaust level. For every three turns of the working piston there is only one rotation of the main power output shaft which results in an excessive friction inside the working chamber between the piston and the casing. Some attempts have been made to provide rotary vane engines, which abate some of the aforementioned problems. For example, U.S. Pat. No. 4,599,976 to Meuret discloses the utilization of spherically shaped chamber and accordingly shaped vanes, which are used to sequentially compress and expand a combustive mixture. It should be noted, however, that the patented system has the following disadvantages. In Meuret patent the ratio between the volume of the chamber and the diameter of the vanes is constant. If the volume of the sphere chamber changes it automatically and proportionally changes the radius of the vanes. In a cylindrical chamber the volume of the chamber can be changed either by simply changing the length of the cylinder or by changing the radius of the cylinder. In each case there is going to be a different output even thought the volume is the same. A cylindrical engine is much easier to manufacture and seal, and to open and repair. Another example of a prior art attempt to overcome some of the disadvantages of existing engines is the U.S. Pat. No. 4,884,532 to Tan, which teaches an extremely complex swinging piston internal combustion engine. While Tan has made certain admirable advantages, his device suffers from the following disadvantages. The Tan engine is big and bulky. There is no power-to-weight ratio advantage over the conventional engine. It would be difficult to manufacture and repair it. It would be difficult to balance it and it would only work as a diesel engine. A further example of a prior art attempt is the U.S. Pat. No. 1,346,805 issued to Barber. Barber discloses a rotatably reciprocating vane internal combustion engine comprising: a water jacketed, double-walled cylindrical casing allowing for cooling fluid to pass through it; the casing equipped with longitudinally extending walls affixed to it; vanes affixed to a shaft rotatably alternating in back and forth fashion; the shaft mounted upon double-walled end plates; four working chambers inside the casing, each chamber experiencing an intake, a compression, an ignition-expanding and lastly an exhaust cycle; four sets of ports, each set for intake of combustible fluid and exhaust thereafter; and four ignition means, one for each chamber. However, Barber engine is a four stroke engine only. Barber fails to disclose ports for intake of combustible fluid and lubricating oil, seal strips and external valving means with an appropriate cam shaft. Unlike the prior art systems, the present invention provides essentially only one moving element, its rotably reciprocating vane piston. Because of pressure balancing on opposite sides of the vane members they may be constructed of lightweight material and the need for heavy bearing and counter-balancing means are virtually eliminated. The invention is capable of running on multiple types of conventionally available fuel and may conceivably be operated on four chamber two stroke cycles, two chamber two stroke cycles, one chamber two stroke cycles, or diesel cycles. SUMMARY AND OBJECTS OF THE INVENTION The instant rotating vane engine comprises a simple rotary vane assemblage mounted within a cylindrical housing having a fixed abutment wall and means for the intake and exhaust of combustible mixture. Primary engine valving is accomplished by simple ports of apertures in the cylindrical housing and, or the end plates or heads for the housing and by the reciprocating motion of the vane assemblage which opens and closes the apertures at the appropriate moment. The bi-directional rotation of the output shaft, upon which the vanes are mounted, may be made uni-directional by well-known external gearing system. The primary object of the present invention is to provide a rotary internal combustion engine, which quickly, efficiently and economically converts thermal energy into usable kinetic energy. A further object of the present invention is to provide a power plant with essentially one moving element with concomitant savings in materials, weight, labor and manufacturing costs. A further object of the present invention is to provide a rotary engine with operating vane wherein the forces on opposite sides of the vanes are essentially balanced and the vibrations are virtually eliminated. Other objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following drawings and description. The accompanying drawings show, by way of illustration, the preferred embodiments of the present invention and the principles of operation therefor. It should be recognized that other embodiments of the invention, applying the same or equivalent principles, may be utilized and structural changes may be made as desired by those skilled in the art, without departing from the spirit of the invention. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS FIG. 1 is a cutaway sectional view across the instant rotating vane engine incorporating an essential swinging piston output shaft forming 4 chamber rooms inside a cylinder; FIG. 2 shows schematically a cutaway cross section side view of the engine taken along the vertical line passing through the axis of the swinging piston shaft; FIG. 3 shows a front view of an alternative connecting rod assembly converting the alternating bi-directional rotary motion of the swinging piston output shaft 6 into a continuous unidirectional rotary motion of the main shaft 22 ( FIG. 2 ). The break in the rod at 27 allows for extending and adjusting the length of the rod according to the desired compression inside the working chambers thus regulating the length of the stroke without the need of replacing the rod. The lower part of said rod is rotatably attached to the flywheel via a slot on that flywheel and is affixed to it with a fastening member comprising a bolt and a nut; FIG. 4 shows schematically the relation of the length of the radius R 1 or R 2 formed between the center of the main shaft 22 ( FIG. 3 ) and the lower end attachment of the crank pin 20 ( FIG. 3 ) to the changing volume of the four chambers a, b, c and d ( FIG. 1 ) formed by the swinging piston 6 ( FIG. 1 ) inside the main cylinder of the engine, in operation. A shorter crank pin creates a longer radius and causes the swinging piston 6 to increase its rotational angle allowing for a longer stroke thus instantly creating a higher compression inside the working chambers; On FIG. 5 there are only two chambers in operation, two spark plugs, a couple of intake ports and a couple of exhaust ports. The intake ports are connected together via a tube 15 ab to a membrane 29 which opens and closes the tube. The exhaust ports are connected at the end to balls 30 or conical members 31 which open and close those ports. There are two cavities b 1 & d 1 on the inside of the cylinder's walls which allow the combustible mixture to move from the supporting chambers into the working chambers when the swinging piston is in motion. The cavities may be open as in FIGS. 5 & 6 or partially covered or bridged ( FIG. 34 ); FIG. 6 is identical to FIG. 5 except that the engine is in a compression stroke, membrane 29 is open for the intake ports and the balls 30 or the conical members 31 are closed for the exhaust ports; FIG. 7 show the configuration of the engine of FIGS. 5 & 6 comprising two working chambers (a & c) and a self lubricating mechanism on the top of the engine and inside the wall 2 . There are two openings ( 1 c & 1 d ) on the bottom of the cylinder, normally closed with screws enabling the drainage of excessive oil when removed, or allowing a regular oil change. FIGS. 8 & 9 show the details of the self lubricating mechanism inside the top wall 2 of FIG. 7 ; FIG. 10 is the same as FIG. 7 except that the two working chambers are b & d; FIG. 11 is the same as FIG. 7 except that the two working chambers are c & d; FIG. 12 is the same as FIG. 7 except that the two working chambers are a & b; In FIG. 13 the vane 8 has been eliminated and there is only one working chamber (a), one spark plug, one intake port and one exhaust port. The engine has been turned counterclockwise 45% and chambers b & c become one chamber on the top, containing the lubricating oil; In FIG. 14 there are four chambers in operation (a, b, c & d), four spark plugs, two exhaust ports shared by two working chambers (a & d) and (b & c) and four intake ports ( 15 a , 15 b , 15 c & 15 d ) delivering fuel, air and lubricant directly into the working chambers; In FIG. 15 only two chambers (a & b) remain operational; FIG. 16 is the same as FIG. 15 except that chambers (c & d) remain operational; FIG. 17 is the same as FIG. 15 except that chambers (a & c) remain operational; FIG. 18 is the same as FIG. 15 except that chambers (b & d) remain operational; FIG. 19 is a partial cross cut side view of the engine of FIGS. 20 , 21 , 22 & 23 . It shows external tubing connecting supercharging chambers d & c to the working chambers a & b; FIG. 20 is the same as FIG. 15 with two additional intake ports 15 e , and apertures 15 f and 15 g for the external tubing of FIG. 19 , allowing compressed air or air/fuel mixture to move from supporting chambers into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, acting as a supercharger. FIG. 21 is the same as FIG. 16 with two additional intake ports 15 e , and apertures 15 f and 15 g for the external tubing of FIG. 19 , allowing compressed air or air/fuel mixture to move from supporting chambers into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, acting as a supercharger; FIG. 22 is the same as FIG. 17 with two additional intake ports 15 e , and the apertures 15 f and 15 g for the external tubing of FIG. 19 , allowing compressed air or air/fuel mixture to move from supporting chambers into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, acting as a supercharger; FIG. 23 is the same as FIG. 18 with two additional intake ports 15 e , and apertures 15 f and 15 g for the external tubing of FIG. 19 , allowing compressed air or air/fuel mixture to move from supporting chambers into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, acting as a supercharger; FIG. 24 is the same as FIG. 12 with two additional intake ports 15 e , for air only, located in the supporting chambers and two main intake ports 15 , relocated in the working chambers delivering fuel only or fuel and air only directly into those chambers. Each cavity on the interior of the engine casing allows the additional air from ports 15 e to move into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, turning the supporting chambers into superchargers; FIG. 25 is the same as FIG. 11 with two additional intake ports 15 e , for air only, located in the supporting chambers and two main intake ports 15 , relocated in the working chambers delivering fuel only or fuel and air only directly into those chambers. Each cavity on the interior of the engine casing allows the additional air from ports 15 e to move into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, turning the supporting chambers into superchargers; FIG. 26 is the same as FIG. 7 with two additional intake ports 15 e , for air only, located in the supporting chambers and two main intake ports 15 , relocated in the working chambers delivering fuel only or fuel and air only directly into those chambers. Each cavity on the interior of the engine casing allows the additional air from ports 15 e to move into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, turning the supporting chambers into superchargers; FIG. 27 is the same as FIG. 10 with two additional intake ports 15 e , for air only, located in the supporting chambers and two main intake ports 15 , relocated in the working chambers delivering fuel only or fuel and air only directly into those chambers. Each cavity on the interior of the engine casing allows the additional air from ports 15 e to move into the working chambers when the piston is in motion, turning the supporting chambers into superchargers; FIG. 28 is the same as FIG. 13 with one additional intake port 15 e , for air only, located in the supporting chamber, turning it into a supercharger, and one main intake port 15 , relocated in the working chamber and delivering fuel only or fuel and air only directly into the working chamber; FIG. 29 is similar to FIG. 12 except that the oil reservoir is on the bottom and it is attached via tubes to chambers c & d. In FIG. 30 there is an oil tank ( 32 ) attached to the bottom of cylinder 1 . The bottom wall 3 of the engine is eliminated and chambers c & d form now one lubricating chamber cd. In FIG. 31 the lubrication of the engine is similar to the lubricating mechanism of FIG. 30 . FIGS. 32 & 33 are similar to FIGS. 11 & 25 with the hollow top wall 2 eliminated and only two chambers (c & d) in operation. FIG. 34 is similar to FIGS. 13 & 28 with two chambers (a & d) in operation. FIG. 35 shows schematically a cross section view of the engine with an alternative version of the operative vanes. The rigid longitudinal vanes 7 & 8 are replaced by articulating vanes 38 , 39 , 40 & 41 . FIG. 36 is an enlarged view of a self lubricating mechanism with the tube 34 and partially hollow shaft 6 . FIG. 37 shows schematically the interior cavities a 1 , b 1 , c 1 or d 1 of cylinder 1 which may be partially covered or bridged by the portion 46 . DETAILED DESCRIPTION With reference to FIGS. 15 , & 20 in the drawings, the essential concept of the present invention and the means by which it is intended to operate may be appreciated. At 1 , a double-walled, water-jacketed, longitudinally extending cylindrical casing is shown, in section. The casing may be conveniently made of aluminum, steel or other commonly used materials. The casing is equipped at 2 and 3 with longitudinally extending walls, which can be unitary with, or affixed to the casing 1 . A rotary shaft is suitably rotably mounted within the casing upon end plates 10 and 11 for the casing ( FIG. 2 ). The shaft is supported in the casing by commonly known bearing means 4 and 5 for mounting a rotary shaft in a motor, pump, or compressor. The shaft is partially hollow to allow the flow of cooling fluids inside it. Similar to the cylindrical casing the end plates 10 & 11 are also double-walled to allow coolant to flow freely from the water pump 25 through all the cavities of the cylinder, the end plates and the shaft in a closed circuit 26 . Fixedly attached to, or unitary with the shaft 6 are rotating vanes 7 and 8 . Suitable seals are provided between the walls 2 and 3 and the shaft and between the vanes 7 and 8 and the casing 1 respectively. The casing 1 is also equipped with plurality of ports, 14 and 15 , which communicate between interior chambers a, b, c and d formed, as shown, between the vanes 7 and 8 and the casing walls 2 and 3 . These ports allow the intake ( 15 ) of combustible fluids and lubricants and the exhaust ( 14 ) thereof from the aforementioned casing chambers. At 24 a compressor, a carburetor or an injection system delivers fuel mixture into the engine. At 23 a box is shown, containing the electrical and electronic systems of the engine. The intake ports 14 may be replaced by injection means. Similarly, there are four ignition means, preferably comprising spark plugs, shown schematically at 16 , 17 , 18 and 19 . The precise details of the ignition means, the valving means, the seals are not, in themselves subject of the present invention and various types of such known components could be used provided that the operative characteristics, in combination, are set forth. For example, Wankel type seals could be used. The particular mode of operation of the invention shown in FIG. 15 now will be described. The vanes 7 and 8 can rotate clockwise and counterclockwise. In so moving the vanes continuously change the volume of the chambers a, b, c, and d. Chambers c & d in this embodiment of the invention are irrelevant. In a two-stroke, operation the engine works as follows. In the position of the vanes shown in FIG. 15 , vanes 7 & 8 are moving in counterclockwise direction and air-fuel mixture and lubricant are being drawn in through port 15 a into the expanding chamber a after the vane 7 moves past this port. Simultaneous with the expansion of chamber a is the contraction of chamber b. The previously drawn in, through intake port 15 b , combustible fluid mixture is now being compressed by the vane 8 against the wall 2 . At maximum compression in chamber b, ignition means 17 fires and causes vanes 8 & 7 to rotate now clockwise with concomitant expansion of this chamber. At the same time the burned exhaust gases in this chamber are free to leave through the port 14 , when the vanes 8 opens this port after passing by it. The previously drawn in fuel mixture of chamber a is now being compressed and new fuel mixture and lubricant is being drawn in in chamber b. At maximum compression in chamber a, ignition means 16 fires and causes the vanes 7 & 8 to rotate again in counterclockwise direction. In FIG. 15 of the engine shown, there are only two working chambers (a & b) and only two intake ports ( 15 ). These intake ports are connected via tubes 15 a & 15 b to membranes 29 , ( FIGS. 5 & 6 ). There are two exhaust ports located close to the bottom of cylinder 1 for a longer working stroke and connected via tubes to balls ( 30 ) or conical members ( 31 ) with springs ( 31 a ), ( FIGS. 5 & 6 ). There are two spark plugs in operation, one for each working chamber, firing sequentially at the end of each compression stroke. In addition, in the embodiment of the engine of FIG. 15 , the bottom wall 3 could be entirely eliminated as in the embodiment of FIG. 31 . In FIG. 16 the engine is the same as the one of FIG. 15 except that the two working chambers are c & d. In FIG. 17 the engine is the same as the one of FIGS. 15 &16 except that the two working chambers are a & c. The two active spark plugs in operation ( 16 & 18 ) fire now simultaneously at the end of each cycle. In FIG. 18 the engine is the same as the one of FIGS. 15 & 16 except that the two working chambers are b & d. The two active spark plugs in operation ( 17 & 19 ) fire now simultaneously at the end of each cycle. At maximum compression, the igniters fire sequentially or simultaneously, in the known manner. Since the vanes 7 & 8 open and close the intake and exhaust ports 15 & 14 for the appropriate chambers, just by moving past them, there is no need for additional internal or external valving. The four chamber two-stroke operation of the engine may be replaced by a dual chamber operation where all of the processes described above are essentially the same for each chamber. For example, only the left or only the right side thus only two chambers in operation, a & d or b & c may be used, therefore only half of the engine, comprising half a cylinder, only one port for intake and one for exhaust, one ignition means and only one vane and or one wall, may be used. On FIGS. 5 & 6 external tubing 15 ab , 14 a & 14 b is shown, which connects the intake and exhaust ports to a membrane 29 and balls 30 or conical members 31 which automatically close and open these ports during the operation of the engine due to the pressure inside the appropriate chambers. FIG. 7 shows an engine which is basically the same as the one pictured in FIGS. 5 & 6 except that the lubricating oil is not injected with the intake mixture of oil, fuel and air but it is provided in a separate container 32 . The top wall 2 inside the engine is partially hollow which forms a cavity 33 . That cavity is connected with a tube 34 through an opening in the cylinder to a reservoir or a container of engine oil 32 on the top of the casing. When the container is filled with oil, the oil drops from it through the tube into the cavity. At the lower end of that tube there is a hollow ball 35 which is floating on the surface of the oil inside the cavity of the wall. When the cavity 33 is partially full with oil, the ball closes the tube, thus preventing more oil entering that cavity. At the lower end of wall 2 there is an opening 36 which allows the oil to leak inside the engine onto the shaft 6 . FIGS. 8 & 9 are enlarged views of the bottom part of the hollow wall 2 . They show the opening 36 which is narrowed on the top and on the bottom. The larger area 36 . 1 inside the opening serves as a small container for the oil before it enters the engine. It also serves as a dosing compartment supplying the engine with exact portions of necessary lubrication. There is a segment 36 . 2 inserted in the opening 36 which has a profile of a pin or of a bolt as shown in the cross section of FIGS. 8 & 9 . That segment closes the narrow top portion of the opening when it is down ( FIG. 9 ). The segment also serves as sealing strip when it is up ( FIG. 8 ). The bottom end of that pin segment is in constant contact with the shaft 6 and slides on the surface of that shaft all the time. The pin moves up and down depending on the position of the shaft. On the surface of the shaft 6 there is a flattened portion 6 . 1 . When the shaft oscillates back and forth the pin segment 36 . 2 touches either the flat portion or the round portion of that shaft and moves up and down. When the pin segment touches the flat portion it slides down either under the pressure of its own weight, if in a vertical position, or under the pressure of the spring 36 . 3 on the top of the pin segment. In a down position it allows certain amount of oil to drip on the shaft from the dosing container 36 . 1 and at the same time it closes the narrow top opening of that container and prevents more oil from entering it. When the shaft turns and the round portion of it comes in contact with the pin segment, it pushes that segment up and stops the oil from leaking out of compartment 36 . 1 onto the shaft. At the same time it opens the top of that compartment and allows more oil to enter into it. When the shaft turns back and forth, the pin moves up and down, oil enters and leaves the container 36 . 1 and enables lubrication inside the engine with a precise predetermined amount of oil. The size of the pin segment regulates the amount of oil. The taller the pin, the more oil enters the small container and then the engine itself and vice versa. As shown in FIG. 7 there are multiple channels and grooves 6 . 2 & 6 . 3 which run on the surface and inside the shaft 6 and the vanes 7 & 8 . The channels and grooves 6 . 2 run approximately in the middle of the flat part of shaft 6 . They run through that shaft and come out on the other side of the shaft. They are also connected with the channels and grooves 6 . 3 which are perpendicular to them and run through the shaft itself and the vanes 7 & 8 . When oil drips on the flat portion of shaft 6 , it enters the channels and grooves 6 . 2 and it moves towards the other side of the shaft. At the same time through the perpendicular channels and grooves 6 . 3 oil reaches each end of vanes 7 & 8 and both sides of the vanes facing the heads of the casing. In this way all of the surfaces inside the engine are being continuously lubricated during the operation. In FIG. 7 there are two openings 1 c & 1 d on the bottom of the cylinder 1 , one for chamber c and one for chamber d. These openings are normally closed with bolts but the bolts may be removed and the engine may be drained in case of oil overflow or general maintenance. This may be done when the engine is not in operation, if needed, or as a regular oil change procedure. In FIGS. 20 , 21 , 22 & 23 the basic design of the engine is the same as the design of FIGS. 15 , 16 , 17 & 18 except that in addition there is a couple of intake ports 15 e for additional air or air/fuel mixture delivered into the supporting chambers. These intake ports are also connected to opening and closing membranes ( 29 ) as the main intake ports 15 ( FIGS. 5 & 6 ). There are two more couples of apertures ( 15 f & 15 g ) connected via external tubing with balls or conical members with springs ( 30 , 31 & 31 a , FIG. 19 ), allowing the additional air or air/fuel mixture to move one way from supporting chambers into the working chambers, enabling the supporting chambers to act as superchargers. In FIG. 30 there is an oil tank ( 32 ) attached to the bottom of cylinder 1 via a tube ( 34 ) and tubes with openings ( 34 c & 34 d ). Oil from that tank enters chambers c & d and when vanes 7 & 8 are in operation, they enter the oil in said chambers and carry it over the interior of the engine for lubrication purposes. In FIG. 31 the lubrication of the engine is similar to the lubrication mechanism of FIG. 30 with the oil container 32 on the bottom and only one tube ( 34 ) connecting it to chambers c & d. The bottom wall 3 of the engine is eliminated and chambers c & d form now one lubricating chamber cd. When the vane 7 & 8 oscillate they enter the oil in that chamber and carry it over the interior of the engine thus lubricating it. As shown in FIG. 35 , chambers are formed between the walls 2 and 3 and the vanes 38 , 39 and 40 , 41 . As the vane segments 39 and 40 rotate clockwise, the vane segments 38 and 41 respectively nutate about the joints 44 and 45 while simultaneously sliding within the bearings 42 and 43 . The chambers a, b, c and d, therefore, expand and contract in a balanced fashion similar to the straight chambers shown in the embodiment of FIG. 1 . On FIG. 36 an enlarged view of an alternative lubricating mechanism is shown. The top wall 2 has been eliminated and the tube 34 connects the oil container 32 (not shown) to the shaft 6 . The tube is narrow on the top ( 34 a ) with a larger diameter ( 34 b ) on the bottom where a segment with a bullet like profile is inserted. That segment is in constant contact with the shaft 6 . When it comes in contact with the flat portion 6 . 1 of the shaft, it drops down and opens tube 34 allowing oil to flow from the tube into the hollow portion 49 of shaft 6 and then into the grooves and channels 6 . 2 and 6 . 3 thus lubricating the inside of the engine. The top part of channels 6 . 2 has a funnel like profile enabling oil to enter easily the hollow portion 49 of shaft 6 . There is a cylinder 50 inside that hollow portion which moves freely when the swinging piston is motion but when the piston stops with vane 7 & 8 in horizontal position as on FIG. 36 , it enters the bedding 51 and closes the lower part of channels 6 . 2 preventing oil from leaking into chambers c & d. Thus the preferred embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described. It must be clearly understood that the preferred embodiments are capable of variation and modification and are not limited to the precise details set forth. For instance, it is apparent that the parts may be modified in size and materials without affecting the essence of the invention. This invention includes all variations and modifications, which fall within the scope of appended claims.

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